Popular Woodworking 2003-10 № 136, страница 14

Popular Woodworking 2003-10 № 136, страница 14

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WOODCRAFT

For your local woodcraft store, visit www.woodcraft.com, or for a free catalog, call 800 542-9115

Dept,03PW10BE

CIRCLE NO. 157 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD.

increased if you had informed me that the Bessey Tradesmen 12" clamp with 4" throat, 1" x 5/16" bar and clamping strength of 800 pounds at $23.99 competes with an economy model 12" with 5" throat, 13/8" x 5/16" bar and a load limit of 1,200 pounds at $15.95. I ask (rhetorically) if you get what you pay for, what are you getting in the 12" Bessey 4" throat that justifies the 3/8" smaller bar size and the $8 higher price?

What you do well in evaluating tools is perhaps best shown by the 12-volt cordless drill comparison in your February 2003 issue. Here, I can understand the basis for your recommendations. Get rid of those Endurance Test reports - another report like the June issue and you will be turning off readers.

Lester McAuliffe via the Internet

Editor's note: The reports in the Endurance Test were never designed to report on comparative data with other products in the same category. They are, in fact, designed to report on the one thing we cannot compare in a direct test comparison such as the drill test you mention. The drill test may give you the information you need about the performance of a new, out-of-the-box product, but it cannot give you any insight as to the likely longevity that tool may have in use in your shop (or mine).

When I think back about the tools we've reviewed in our Endurance Test column, they are all woodworking classics that have literally stood the ultimate test - the test of time.

These are products that any woodworker could buy with confidence. It may be that not every woodworker can afford some of them, but that is not necessarily our biggest concern in this instance. They are still good tools and, I'd go so far as to say, the best in their class.

I am not trying to change your mind about how tools should be tested. I'm just trying to show you why we think Endurance Test has a valid position in our article lineup.

- Steve Shanesy, editor & publisher

Beginner Could Have Used More Definitions in Lumber Glossary

As a beginning woodworker, I enjoy the tips, tricks and general information in your magazine very much. I would, however, like to comment on the "Lusting for Lumber" articles that appeared in August 2003.

I enjoyed the "Sticker Shock" story about the man getting a great deal when the clerk didn't know the difference between "dressed" and "undressed" lumber. Well, to tell you the truth, I don't know the difference either. It would have been nice if you told the difference, especially because there was a glossary accompanying the article.

Also, in that glossary, the definition for "dimensional lumber" states that a 1 x 4 will typically measure 3/4" x 31/4". Shouldn't the larger dimension be 334"?

Finally, and I know this is a real nit-pick, the definition for "air-dried lumber" states that it reduces the moisture content to about 12 percent to 15 percent. It would have been nice, just for information, if the definition of the "kiln-dried lumber" also would have listed the moisture content.

Lane Wallace Knoxville, Tennessee

Editor's note: You've got some good questions. "Dressed" lumber has been planed down and is presumably ready to use, while "undressed" is in the rough right from the sawmill. We should have included that in the article's glossary.

As to the actual width of a 1 x 4, I was being generous when I said it was 31/4". Most 1 x 4s in my neck of the woods are more like 31/s" wide.

As to kiln-dried lumber, the final moisture content depends on the region of the country and where the lumber is stored. It can be anywhere from 7percent to 12 percent on average. Thanks for pointing that out. PW

— Christopher Schwarz, executive editor

CORRECTION

Popular Woodworking corrects all significant errors. For a list of corrections to the magazine, or to report one, please visit our web site at popwood.com and click on "Magazine Extras."

• In the Saw Blade Box (June 2003), the 3/4"-wide x 1/2"-deep rabbet should be cut on two short edges and one long edge of the top and bottom of the box, not on two long edges and one short edge.

14

Popular Woodworking October 2003

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