Popular Woodworking 2004-02 № 139, страница 14

Popular Woodworking 2004-02 № 139, страница 14

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Letters

'Poop' was Promised, But Never Delivered

Reader Still Wondering Why Certain Hand Planes are So Pricey

In reading your response to "Why are Some Planes So Expensive?" (Q&A, November 2003) I was amazed at how good a job you did at not answering the question. I bet the person asking for the "straight poop on hand planes" was disappointed, too. In my experience, any hand plane needs to be tuned up whether it is new or used, regardless of price. By touching on some relevant points, such as body material (either cast or ductile iron), blade material (A2 tool steel or cryo-genically treated), blade thickness and overall design, you could have enlightened us as to why some planes truly are so expensive, thus giving him (and us) some "straight poop."

Cody J. Niendorf Ashton, Idaho

Editor's Note: While I didn't specifically mention ductile iron or A2 tool steel, I did say the premium planes are "better-made, better-machined and work extremely well." For a detailed discussion of the differences between low-cost and expensive planes, see our review of metal-bodied jack planes in the April 2002 issue (available for sale online). We examined materials and machining tolerances for a variety of inexpensive, mid-range and premium brands.

- Christopher Schwarz, executive editor

Hand-plane Connoisseur Curious About Endurance Test Statement

I have been a hand-plane user and collector for the past 29 years. Since the mid-1980s, my collection of Lie-Nielsen planes has multiplied in my shop like rabbits!

So I was puzzled why, in your tribute to the Lie-Nielsen low-angle jack plane (Endurance Test, November 2003) you suggest grinding the blade at 90°. Doing so does not make a scraper - it makes a blunt instrument. There are so many purpose-built scrapers available, ranging from a few dol

12 Popular Woodworking February 2004

lars to hundreds, any of which produce a fine shaving instead of pulverized dust, that I found this suggestion a bit of a stretch. It's hard to imagine why anyone would buy a $40 replacement blade and grind it off square!

Peter R. Presnell Kneeland, California

Editor's Note: Grinding the edge at 90° to make a scraper plane is something that works for me. I got the tip from Brian Boggs, a chairmaker in Berea, Ky., and have demonstrated it many times. I don't argue that a purpose-built scraper would be better, but you're going to spend more than $40 for a good one.

- Christopher Schwarz, executive editor

Table Saw Article Serves as Impetus For Reader to Fix His Own Machine

I usually adjust my saws and equipment every so often, but I haven't had time lately to check the saw I recently purchased. Reading "Table Saw Tune-up" (November 2003) gave me an incentive to see how far off it was. I knew it was off a little, but was surprised to learn just how far off it was. Thanks.

George A. Ulrick Jr.

DeWitt, Nebraska

continued on page 14

WRITE TO US

Popular Woodworking welcomes letters from readers with comments about the magazine or woodworking in general. We try to respond to all correspondence. Published letters may be edited for length or style. All letters become the property of Popular Woodworking. How to send your letter:

• E-mail: popwood@fwpubs.com

• Fax:513-891-7196

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