38 - Ring Boxes, страница 2

38 - Ring Boxes, страница 2

ShopNotes

issue 38

March 1998

publisher Donald B. Peschke

editor Tim Robertson

assistant editor Bryan Nelson

art director Cary Christensen

sr. graphic designer Kurt SchllltZ

senior illustrators Roger Reiland Mark Higdon

creative resources

Creative Director:Ted Kralicek • Project Developer: Ken Munkel • Project Designers: Ted Wong, Kevin Boyle • Project Coordinator. Kent Welsh • Shop Mgr.: Steve Curtis • Shop Craftsman: Steve Johnson • Photography Director: Lark Smothermon • Sr. Photographer: Crayola England

books

Executive Editor: Douglas L. Hicks • Art Director: Linda F. Vermie • Sr. Graphic Designer: Chris Glowacki

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VP of Planning & Finance: Jon Macarthy • Controller: Robin Hutchinson • Sr. Acct: Laura Thomas • Accts. Payable: Mary Schulta • Accts. Receivable: Margo Petrus

• Prod. Dir.: George Chmielarz • Elect. Pub.: Douglas M. Lidster • Prod. Asst.: Susan Dickman • Pre-Press Image Spec- Tboy Clark • New Media Mgr.: Gordon C. Gaippe

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ShopNotes® (ISSN 1062-9696) is published bimonthly (Jan., March, May, July, Sept., Nov.) by August Home Publishing, 2200 Grand, Des Moines, IA 50312. ShopNotes® is a registered trademark of August Home Publishing ©Copyright 1997 by August Home Publishing. All rights reserved.

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EDITOR'S NOTE

Cutoffs

One question I often get asked is, "Why don't you guys at ShopNotes feature more turning projects and techniques for the lathe?"

Well, to be perfectly honest, I don't have that much experience working on a lathe. So up to now, I've been just a bit hesitant to tackle a lathe project.

However, Bryan (our assistant editor), is pretty good on a lathe. In fact, he's turned several projects recently that have really caught my interest. But they either look too complicated. Or they require too many different turning tools. 'Okay, if you were

holds rings and pieces of jewelry. And usually the box has a lid so you can hide your treasures inside."

That's when the light bulb finally lit. A ring box sounded exactly like the type of project we were looking for.

two tools. As it turns out, it was far easier to turn a ring box than I ever imagined. In fact, the base of the box and the lid can be turned with two basic tools: a scraper and a parting tool. (See page 10 for tips on using a scraper.)

finish. Not only that, you can accomplish the entire project (from initial shaping to

going to include just Experiment a little. Have the fmal aPPlica"

one simple project in ~ A J 1 +

an issue, what would SOmejUU. Ana Let trie while it's still on the

it be?" I asked. shavings fly. lathe. (We've also

"How about a small -

hand mirror that slips into a lady's purse?" he said. So we decided to give it a try.

The mirror was simple enough. We turned a basic disk, scooped out a shallow recess, and glued in the mirror. But there was still something about it that wasn't quite right.

So we showed the mirror to Jeanne (our receptionist). She said, "The biggest problem with that mirror is it will get all scratched up in a woman's purse. How about adding a cover?"

That sounded like a great idea. And it didn't take us long to turn a cover for the mirror. But when we put the two pieces together, they resembled a hamburger bun more than a mirror. Fortunately, the project was about to take a "turn" for the better.

ring box. Jeanne took one look at the mirror and said, "It's too big for my purse, but you could make a nice ring box out of it."

"So just what is a ring box?" I asked.

"You know, it's a small box that

- included an article

about finishing on a lathe, see page 28.)

jam chucks. But there is one thing that might stump you when turning ai ring box. It has to do with turning the" bottom of the box.

The problem is the bottom is turned after you've scooped out the insides of the box. But if the box is hollowed out like a pumpkin, how do you remount it on the lathe? The solution is a simple "jam" chuck turned from a block of wood. (For more on this, see page 29.)

experiment. As you can see, I'm excited about these ring boxes. They provide a great opportunity to experiment with different types of wood. In fact, we used several pieces of highly figured wood we've been saving for just the right project, refer to page 12.

Regardless of the type of wood you use, don't be afraid to experiment a little with the basic shape. Just a subtle change can have a dramatic effect in the appearance of the box.

So have some fan with this project. And let the shavings fly.

Reprinted 2002 2

2 ShopNotes

No. 38

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