Popular Woodworking 2009-12 № 180, страница 14




Popular Woodworking 2009-12 № 180, страница 14

Splitting. Splitting thin pieces is not difficult and you don't need a lot of specialty equipment. Here I'm using a lightweight (read cheap) basket froe. I smacked it into the end grain of this oak using a homemade dogwood root cudgel. Though a riving brake would make this job safer and easier, steadying the log with your feet works also. Just try not to get a snag in your favorite baby blue stockings!

I've talked in the past about the speed of 18th-century craft work. I based that on documentary evidence. Here, we can see what I think is physical evidence of 18th- century craftsmen making material choices to increase their efficiency. I find this interesting for a couple reasons:

After having described (once again) that our ancestors were essentially nothing like us, here is an example of how we are alike:impatient, looking to cut corners and maybe not as concerned as we should be about wear, repair, and expansion and contraction. The other reason I find this interesting is that it elucidates the intentions of period artisans. Fans of period work (I mean me) can sometimes over-analyze what we see. I think it's true that quartersawn - or even better, riven stock - makes a better drawer. The question is, were they intending to make a better drawer or just a faster one? The answer may be hidden right before our eyes. PW

Visit Adam's blog at artsandmysteries.com for more discussion of traditional woodworking techniques.

popularwoodworking.com ■ 21



Обсуждение
Понравилось?
Войдите чтобы оставить комментарий
Понравилось?